The name 'November' is believed to derive from 'novem' which is the Latin for the number 'nine'.  In the ancient
Roman calendar November was the ninth month after March.  As part of the seasonal calendar November is the
time of the 'Snow Moon' according to Pagan beliefs and the period described as the 'Moon of the Falling Leaves'
by Black Elk

Dear Members and Garden Friends
For garden fun and garden know-how, wherever you live, please join us in our activities in the upcoming year.

MEETING: Wednesday, December 13, 11:00 AM
Dunwoody Library, Williams Room

PROGRAM: Holiday Luncheon
(No Program)

December is a time for us to be thankful for our many blessings and share with those who are less fortunate. Our many blessings include the wonderful camaraderie and friendships that we have developed within our club. This month we will again celebrate our friendships and the holiday season with our popular covered dish luncheon which usually includes some fun games that everyone enjoys.

for more info contact Rose@DunwoodyGardenClub.com

Winter came down to our home one night
Quietly pirouetting in on silvery-toed slippers of snow,
And we, we were children once again.
~Bill Morgan, Jr.

Winter either bites with its teeth or lashes with its tail.  ~Proverb

"No winter lasts forever; no spring skips its turn."
-   Hal Borland 

DeKalb Federation of Garden Clubs
www.dekalbfederation.com


Check out the calendar of the Garden Club of Georgia for new and interesting events

The News of Redbud District

Walter Reeves page for
Gardening Events around town for December

Please check out "Gail the Gardener" column on the Redbud website. Go to www.RedbudDistrict.com and click on Education, then Gail the Gardener. Also Renee Hopf has a very nice Birds and Bees page. Lots of good info on this site.

Of winter's lifeless world each tree
Now seems a perfect part;
Yet each one holds summer's secret
Deep down within its heart.
Charles G. Stater

"Yule, is when the dark half of the year relinquishes to the light half. Starting the next morning at sunrise, the sun climbs just a little higher and stays a little longer in the sky each day. Known as Solstice Night, or the longest night of the year, much celebration was to be had as the ancestors awaited the rebirth of the Oak King, the Sun King, the Giver of Life that warmed the frozen Earth and made her to bear forth from seeds protected through the fall and winter in her womb. Bonfires were lit in the fields, and crops and trees were "wassailed" with toasts of spiced cider."
- Yule Lore

For more information, contact: rose@DunwoodyGardenClub.com

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